‘The Disembowelled Horse’ A Place-Name Tale From Gaelic Oral Tradition

  • Ian A. Fraser

Abstract


The recording of traditional information by the School of Scottish Studies, at least in the Gaelic speaking area, was at its height in the 1960s and 1970s. This was the period when funds for field collection were relatively available, while there were still many native bearers of tradition who were willing to impart important amounts of precious material. Nevertheless, it was becoming increasingly obvious that the Gaelic mainland was losing its native speakers rapidly and that collection there should be a priority. Their dispersed populations, from Kintyre to Sutherland, meant that the costs associated with fieldwork were rising, as these areas lacked the concentrated populations found in the Western Isles. A special effort was called for to overcome the difficulties.The recording of traditional information by the School of Scottish Studies, at least in the Gaelicspeaking area, was at its height in the 1960s and 1970s. This was the period when funds for field collection were relatively available, while there were still many native bearers of tradition who were willing to impart important amounts of precious material. Nevertheless, it was becoming increasingly obvious that the Gaelic mainland was losing its native speakers rapidly and that collection there should be a priority. Their dispersed populations, from Kintyre to Sutherland, meant that the costs associated with fieldwork were rising, as these areas lacked the concentrated populations found in the Western Isles. A special effort was called for to overcome the difficulties.
Published
01-Feb-2017
How to Cite
Fraser, I. (2017, February 1). ‘The Disembowelled Horse’ A Place-Name Tale From Gaelic Oral Tradition. Scottish Studies, 37, 83 - 85. https://doi.org/https://doi.org/10.2218/ss.v37i0.1795
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